Dangerous foods and household products

Certain foods and household products can be dangerous to dogs!

It’s only natural for dogs to be curious. But their curiosity can get them into trouble when they get into areas where you store household items such as medicine and detergents.  Many common household items that you use everyday can be harmful, and sometimes even lethal, to your dog.

Foods that are harmful to your dog: (May cause vomiting, abdominal pain and/or diarrhea.

Wild cherry

Almond

Apricot

Balsam Pear

Japanese Plum

 

May cause varied reactions:

Yeast dough

Coffee grounds

Macadamia nuts

Tomato and potato leaves and stems

Avocados

Onions and onion powder

Grapes

Raisins

Chocolate

Pear and peach kernels

Mushrooms (if also toxic to humans)

Rhubarb

Spinach

Alcohol

 

Common household items that are harmful to your dog:

Acetaminophen

Antifreeze and other car fluids

Boric acid

Deodorants

Deodorizers

Detergents

De-icing salts

Disinfectants

Drain cleaners

Furniture polish

Gasoline

Hair colorings

Weed killers

Insecticides

Kerosene

Matches

Mothballs

Nail polish and remover

Paint

Prescription and non-prescription medicine

Rat Poison

Rubbing alcohol

Shoe polish

Sleeping pills

Snail or slug bait

Turpentine

Windshield-wiper fluid

 

Symptoms of possible poisoning are: vomiting, diarrhea, difficult breathing, abnormal ruin (color, aroma or odor, frequency, etc.), salivation, weakness.  If your dog should inject harmful chemicals, contact a veterinarian or poison control center immediately.

 

Specific comments from he ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center – #1-888-426-4435

Chocolate, Coffee and Caffeine
These products all contain substances called methylxanthines, which are found in cacao seeds, the fruit of the plant used to make coffee, and in the nuts of an extract used in some sodas. When ingested by pets, methylxanthines can cause vomiting and diarrhea, panting, excessive thirst and urination, hyperactivity, abnormal heart rhythm, tremors, seizures and even death. Note that darker chocolate is more dangerous than milk chocolate. White chocolate has the lowest level of methylxanthines, while baking chocolate contains the highest.

Coconut and Coconut Oil
When ingested in small amounts, coconut and coconut-based products are not likely to cause serious harm to your pet. The flesh and milk of fresh coconuts do contain oils that may cause stomach upset, loose stools or diarrhea. Because of this, we encourage you to use caution when offering your pets these foods. Coconut water is high in potassium and should not be given to your pet.

Grapes and Raisins
Although the toxic substance within grapes and raisins is unknown, these fruits can cause kidney failure. Until more information is known about the toxic substance, it is best to avoid feeding grapes and raisins to dogs.

Milk and Dairy
Because pets do not possess significant amounts of lactase (the enzyme that breaks down lactose in milk), milk and other dairy-based products cause them diarrhea or other digestive upset.

Nuts
Nuts, including almonds, pecans, and walnuts, contain high amounts of oils and fats. The fats can cause vomiting and diarrhea, and potentially pancreatitis in pets.

Onions, Garlic, Chives
These vegetables and herbs can cause gastrointestinal irritation and could lead to red blood cell damage. Although cats are more susceptible, dogs are also at risk if a large enough amount is consumed. Toxicity is normally diagnosed through history, clinical signs and microscopic confirmation of Heinz bodies.

Raw/Undercooked Meat, Eggs and Bones
Raw meat and raw eggs can contain bacteria such as Salmonella and E. coli that can be harmful to pets and humans. Raw eggs contain an enzyme called avidin that decreases the absorption of biotin (a B vitamin), which can lead to skin and coat problems. Feeding your pet raw bones may seem like a natural and healthy option that might occur if your pet lived in the wild. However, this can be very dangerous for a domestic pet, who might choke on bones, or sustain a grave injury should the bone splinter and become lodged in or puncture your pet’s digestive tract.

Salt and Salty Snack Foods
Large amounts of salt can produce excessive thirst and urination, or even sodium ion poisoning in pets. Signs that your pet may have eaten too many salty foods include vomiting, diarrhea, depression, tremors, elevated body temperature, seizures and even death. As such, we encourage you to avoid feeding salt-heavy snacks like potato chips, pretzels, and salted popcorn to your pets.

Xylitol
Xylitol is used as a sweetener in many products, including gum, candy, baked goods and toothpaste. It can cause insulin release in most species, which can lead to liver failure. The increase in insulin leads to hypoglycemia (lowered sugar levels). Initial signs of toxicosis include vomiting, lethargy and loss of coordination. Signs can progress to seizures. Elevated liver enzymes and liver failure can be seen within a few days.

Yeast Dough
Yeast dough can rise and cause gas to accumulate in your pet’s digestive system. This can be painful and can cause the stomach to bloat, and potentially twist, becoming a life threatening emergency. The yeast produce ethanol as a by-product and a dog ingesting raw bread dough can become drunk (See alcohol).

 

 

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